Ronald Calinger: Neilly Series Lecture

Title

Ronald Calinger: Neilly Series Lecture

Date

2008-03-26

Description

Professor of history at the Catholic University of America in Washington, DC, Calinger will discuss the mathematician Leonhard Euler. The Swiss-born genius is one of the four greatest mathematicians in history. This synopsis of his life, research, and influence set within the framework of the European Enlightenment begins with a review of his education in Basel. Euler's Berlin period includes his invention of the calculus of variations, his relations with Frederick the Great, his pulse theory in optics, and his rivalry with Alexis Clairaut and Jean d'Alembert over lunar theory. His second period in St. Petersburg includes his third lunar theory and his contributions to integral calculus and magic squares.

Calinger is the author of A Contextual History of Mathematics,1999, the editor of Classics of Mathematics, 1995, Vita Mathematica, 1996, and the History of Mathematics Series of Johns Hopkins University Press. 

Format

image/jpeg

Files

calinger.gif

Citation

Calinger, Ronald, “Ronald Calinger: Neilly Series Lecture,” RBSCP Exhibits, accessed June 21, 2021, https://rbscpexhibits.lib.rochester.edu/items/show/4796.

Transcribe This Item

  1. calinger.gif
  2. Neilly-Series-2007-2008.pdf